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Full text of "X Collection 174A"

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X Collection 
INDEX 



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Barcode Number 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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020 534 722 7 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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020 534 723 9 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



II II Hill III Hill till 



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The Royal Hungarian 
Commercial cMuseum 

Budapest 



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ROYAL HUNGARIAN 
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THE 

NORTHERN 
HIGHLANDS 
OF HUNGARY 



ERDELYI 

PHOTOGRAPHER BY 
APPOINTMENT TO THE 
IMP. AND ROY. COURTS 
BUDAPEST, lgiO. 



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BOARDING HOUSES. ffiJ^Sffi 

Daranyi Erzsebet, Exouisite, Gizefla, Grimm, Gyorfi, Renaissance' 
Ungar, Vilma, Hajduska. r* NEAR THE CITY. Andrassy 
Anker Bellevue Budapest, Dombay, Elite, Palatinus, Nador 
M \mWr P S"A-i K° ssu "\ Kuri ?. L^atos, Palace, Vazsonyi. 
IN BUDA. Hadik, Semmenng. Average boarding house prices 
6 — 10 P per- day. 



DISTANCES'TO BUDAPEST IN HOURS 



Amsterdam 26 

Athens 30 

Angora ....;.. 55 

Barcelona 42 

Beigrad 7 

Berlin (6 

Be/ne 26 

Bremen 26 

Brussels 29 

Bucharest 18 

Geneva 28 



from 

Hague 

Hamburg 

Helsinki . 
Kopenhagen 
Kdnigsberg . 
London . . 
Lemberg . 
Milan . . . 
Munich. . . 
Nuremberg 
Oslo . . 



from 

Paris 25 

Prague ., . 10 

Rfg» 35 

Rome 26 

Sofia 17 

Stockholm 45 

Tallin (Reval) ... 46 

Venice 17 

Warsaw 16 

Vienna . 41/ 

... tfl 



Zurich 



SOME INTERESTING STATISTICS ABOUT BUDAPEST 

Population of the City 1 004 681 

Population of the City and Suburbs . l',421.boo 
Area of Budapest 19.444 (hectares) 

.... . . _ M (about 48.000 acres) 

Medicinal Baths 1f j 

Sanatoriums ' ' 30 

Museums 28 

Theatres '.'.'...'. 20 

Cabarets etc . . . j 

Hotels, First Class '.'.'.'.'. . ". . ' '.'.'" 12 

Superior Middle-Class ............ 15 

a Cheap accommodation ' ' 40 

Sport-Grounds 40 

Danube Bridges '.'..'.., k 

Number of Electric framcars. . '." '1760 

Length of Electric Tramway Lines 559 km 

Number of Autobuses 215 

Number of Autotaxis 14^ 



MUNICIPAL INFORMATION 



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■ Printing-Office of tfce Municipality of BwUpew | 



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Budapest szekesfovdros 
idegenforgalmi propaganda)® 

Becsben 

Beszamolo a „Budapesti Idegenforgalmi Iroda Becsben" 

1933. evi tevekenysegerol 



IRTA 

KOVACSHAZY VILMOS 

SZEKESFdVAROSI TAMACSMOK 



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BUDAPEST SZEKESF6VAROS HAZINYOMDAJA 1934 - 3214 

NGARIAN REFERENCE LIBRAE 

Pi'opirty of 
THE LIBRARY OF CONGSSSS 



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MUNICIPAL INFORMATION OFFICE BUDAPEST 



No. 2 Dedk Ferenc St. — Telegrams: ESEFA, Budapest - 
Vienna; The Budapest Tourist Bureau, I.. Kdrntnerstrasse 51. 
Information, accomodation, guides, prospectu 



- Telephone: R 27-4-69 



Published by th* MUNICIPAL INFORMATION O FFI C I, Budapest, Hungary. 

Responsible author: Municipal Information Office, Budapest, Hungary. 

Printed in Hungary. — Municipal printing works of Budapest 1938 —1293 (angol) 

Responsible Printing works manager: KurfLirst I., General" Manager. 



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BUDAPEST 

THE QUEEN OF THE DANUBE 

ONEOFTHE MOST BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED 
CAPITALS IN TJHE WORLD. 

THE SPA OF THE INCOMPARABLE THERMAL SPRINGS. 






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BUDAPEST 



With the compliments of the Hungarian Commercial Bank of Pest 



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Uberreicht durch die Pester Ungarische Commercial-Bank 



Offert par la Banque Commerciale Hongroise de Pest 



HUNGARIAN PEFERENCE LIBRARY 

P'-u erty of 

THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



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MAGVA8 vARCSOK 




Informatitmen-durch X"D8917 

Budapestsr FrefiianVsrkehJbiiro 



Wien I, KarntrierstraBe 51 
Telefon R-27-4-69 



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B U D A V A R I 
BARLANGPINCEK 

(VARHEGYI BARLANG) 

BARLA^GTANI 
GYU3TEMENY 

BUDAPEST SZGKESF6VAROS 
legujabb FOLDALATTI LATVANYOSSAGA 

A MAGYAR BARLANGKUTATO TARSULAT KEZELESEBEN 




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SIEBENBURGEN 

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V E R L A G 
UES UNGARISCHEJN LANDESAMTKS FUll FREMDENVERKEHK 
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OM HORSEBACK 
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tours arranged by tbe 

HUNGARIAN LANDOWNERS'RIDING 

ASSOCIATION BUDAPEST iv/.ApPONYI-teH. 



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fares, guides, accommodation, excursions into the country 
cheque-books, special trains, etc. ' 

At major frontier stations travellers will find at their 
disposal, free of charge, information officials speaking several 
languages. 

Visitors are conducted by professionally-trained and 
State-controlled guides. 

LITTLE BIBLIOGRAPHY ABOUT HUNGARY. 
Lederer: Made in Hungary. — Stein: Fly my Swallow . 
A merry guide through Hungarian songs and gipsy music. — 
Budapest Illustrated. — Viski: Hungarian Peasant Customs. 
Viski: Hungarian Dances. — Buday: Book of Ballads — 
Gundel: Hungarian Cookery Book. — Humphrey Grace: 
Come with me through Budapest. — Balogh: Modern Magyar 
Lyrics. — Radisics: Hungary Yesterday and Today. — Bajan- 
Cicerone of Budapest, with 216 pictures. — Balanyi: The 
history of Hungary. — Eckhart: A Short history of the Hun- 
garian people. — Lukinich: History of Hungary in bio- 
graphies. — C. A Macartney: Hungary. - Undi: Hungarian 
rancy needle work and weaving. 

Published by the Hungarian National Office for Tourism 

(Budapest, II., Lanchid-u. 3.) 

Printed in Hungary. 




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PUBLISHED BY THE HUNGARIAN NATIONAL OFFICE 
FOR TOURISM (O. M. I. H ). BUDAPEST 



"RINTEH IN HUNGARY 



STADIUM NYOMDA, BUDAPEST 



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usadvana sviivd ab AavsNfiH ni aaiNisd 

t aai-cpavoiA "A 'isadvana 'Oh i w -o) wssanoi aod 3DiddO ivnoiivn NviaveNDH 3hi Aa aaHsnand 



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KALOCSA 

URALTE UNGARISCHE ERZBISCHOFLICHE 
IDENZSTADT.EINE REICHE FUNDGRUBE 
>ER UNGARISCHEN VOLKSKUNST 



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aus Eindern ungarischer Basse, die unglaublicb. abgehartet 
und anspruchslos sind. Vom Vorfruhling bis in die 
Frdste des Spatherbstes hinein werden sie ausschlieesslieb. 
unter freiem Himmel gehalten. Dalier der Name „rauhe 
Binderherden". Diese Basse liefert die besten Zug- und 
Fleiscfaoohsen. Die Domiine hat mit dieser Zucht eine 
grosse Anzahl von Preisen errungen und sind ihre Zucht- 
stiere sefar gesuribt. Die ausgedehnten 

HOPFENGABTEN der Doniane befinden sicb ebenfalls 
auf der Hild-puszta. Die hiesige Hopfenproduktion wettei- 
fert in ibrer Qualitfit mit dem bohmischen Hopfen von 
Saaz. 

DEN WEINBATJ ikonnen wir in Ersekhalma auf 25 
Kim. von Kalocsa besiobtigen. Von bier stammen die 
vorzuglicihen Weinsorten der Kalocsaer erzbischoflichen 
Domane. 

JAGD AUF GEOSSWTLD. In den Waldern der Do- 
mane an den TJfern der Donau gibt es Hirscho, Behe und 
Wildscibweine in grosser Zahl. Jagdliebhaber mogen siob 
zwecks naherer Aufklarungen an die Giiterdirektion der 
erzbischoflidhen Domane in Ealoesa wenden. 



VERLAG DER FREMDENVERKEHRSSTELLE DER STADT KALOCSA 
(VAROShAza). — STADIUM, BUDAPEST. 



PAINTED LN. HUNGARY 



HO^aABIAN EBFEBBNCE W 

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r 3o? CONGRESS 1 



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FIVE CHURCHES 

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stadt Pecs. — Tusch. 

t tt»t» « T>V zeichnungen von Ernst 

\TG ABIAN REFERENCE LIBRAKX. Gebauer, Plane von Julius 

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HOSPITALITY 



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HUNG ATt'ANlSElTEHBNCE LIBRARY 



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Kiadja ar Orszagos Magyar Idegenforgalmi Hivafal 

IO. M. I. H.|, Budapest. 

Nyomta Kldsz Gy8rgy es Fia, Budapest. 




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UPLANDS OF HUNGARY 

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PUBLISHED BY THE 

STRANGERS' INQUIRY OFFICE 
BUDAPEST, IV., VIGADO-TER I. 



PUBLISHED BY THE ..CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE OF 
THE HUNG. STATE RAILWAYS" 
BUDAPEST, VIOADO-TER 1. 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 



33 Pembridge Square London W2 Bayswater 2642 








BUDAPEST.^ INSTITUTE OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. 



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After the first World War, the people of the world sank into 
a sychological crisis, perhaps most strikingly revealed in the 
condition of the children. 

General medical practice considered it outside its sphere 
of immediate activity to assume responsibility for these cases. 
Later, however, the demand became so great that it was imposs- 
ible to separate the theory and practice of psychology. 
Because of this Dr. Janos Schnell in 1929, opened the Institute 
of Child Psychology, /Therapeutic Pedagogy/. Education and 
Career Selection Advise Bureau. In the early days work was 
done "by voluntary workers, without any subsidy from the State 
Now, after 20 years experience, the Institute has the following 
departments . 

A. Practical Work . 

1. Registry Department ; Registers the particulars and case 

histories of those who come for 
exami nation, referring them for further examination to 
specialists. 

2. Medical Department : Every psychological examination must be 

preceded by a thorough examination by 
a medical specialist. Result of this medical examination is 
closely allied to examinations made in the psycho-diagnostical 
department. Final diagnosis is reached by the teamwork of 
both doctor and psychologist. Treatment is either medical or 
psycho-therapeutic , 

3. Psycho-diagnostical Department : i/ Establishes the stage 

of development of the child 
/intelligence, attitude, behaviour, etc./ ii/ Delineates the 
particular character- type of the child, iii/ Delineates the 
Child's inherited temperament, iv/ Establishes the psychor 
pathological symptoms where suspected. 

4. Ceroer-SelectionGuidanca : This is one of the most impor- 

tant activities of the Institute. 
In this work the optimal interests of the individual must be 
brought into harmony with the economic interest of society. 
Career Guidance includes an examination of psychological 
endowments. 

5. Psycho-therapeutic Department : Often it is sufficient to 

advise relatives and teachers 
to eliminate the external factors causing the trouble,. At 
other times the patient needs deep psychological treatment, 







X-PB 9^3 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 



33 Pembridge Square London W2 Bayswater 2642 




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NEW HUNGARIAN CABINET, 



Details of the new Hungarian Cabinet were announced on Friday 
last, 10th June, following the recent elections. 

Three new Ministries have been formed by separation of 
the Ministry of Industry into Heavy and Light Industry; 
Ministry of Trade into Internal and External Trade; Ministry 
of Education and Religious Affairs into Public Education 
/Adult/ and School Education and Religious Affairs. 

Members of the new Cabinet are as follows;- 



Prime Minister. 

Deputy Prime Minister. 

Minister of State 

Minister of Interior. 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
/Replacing Laszlo Rajk./ 



Minister of Defence. 
Minister of Justice. 
Minister of Finance. 

Minister of Transport & 
Post Master General . 

Minister of Agriculture. 

Minister of Heavy Industry, 



Istvan Dobi . 

Maty as Rakosi. 

Erno Gero . 

Janos Kadar . 

Gyula Kallai. + 

Since Nov 1948 chief of Presid- 
ent's office. 

Born 1910, son of shoemaker. 
In gaol in 1942. 
Member of Central Cttee Comm. 
Party in 1945. 

Mihaly Parkas . 

lot van Re is. 

Istvan Kossa. /replacing Erno 

Gero/ . 

Lao os Bebrits. 
Ferenc Erdei. 



+ 
+ 



Mihaly Zsofinecz 
Chairman, Hoffer Factory. 
Born I9O6, working class origin. 
In 1930 became member Social 
Democratic Party, joined Comm. 
Party in 1945. 



Minister of Light Industry. Gyorgy Marosan t 






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33 Pembridge Square London W2 Bayswater 264 




NiiW HUNGARIAN CABINET, 




K-D8 92v 



*11 



Details of the new Hungarian Cabinet were announced on Friday 
last, 10th June, following the recent elections. 



"N 



Three new Ministries have been formed by separation of 
the Ministry of Industry into Heavy and Light Industry; 
Ministry of Trade into Internal and External Trade ; Ministry 
of Education and Religious Affairs into Public Education 
/Adult/ and School Education and Religious Affairs. 



L 



Members of the new Cabinet are as follows.:- 



C 



Prime Minister. 

Deputy Prime Minister. 

Minister of State 

Minister of Interior. 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
/Replacing Laszlo Rajk./ 



Minister of Defence. 
Minister of Justice. 
Minister of Finance. 

Minister of Transport & 
Post Master General . 

Minister of Agriculture. 

Minister of Heavy Industry, 



Istvan Dobi . 

Maty as Rakosi. 

Erno Ger6o 

Janos Kadar . 

Gyula Kallai. + 

Since Nov 1948 chief of Presid- 
ent's office. 

Born 1910, son of shoemaker. 
In gaol in 1942. 
Member of Central Cttee Comm. 
Party in 1945. 

B/lihaly Farkas . 

Istvan Re is. 
Istvan Kossa. /replacing Erno 



Gero/ . 



Lajos Bebrits. 
Ferenc Erdei. 



+ 

+ 



Ivlihaly Zsofinecz 
Chairman, Hoffer Factory. 
Born I9O6, working class origin, 
In 1930 became member Social 
Democratic Party, joined Comm. 
Party in 1945, 



Minister of Light Industry. Gyorgy Marosan t 



W^ r.lr-1 -^ ~. "D~ ~— 1 ~ „ 



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AGRICULTURAL NEWS 
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T HE H U N G A RJAN N F. W S fy T Nf F O R M A T I U N S E R V F C E 

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t-VBlle *11 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 

33 Pembridge Square London W2 Bayswater 2642 /«^ 

(SEP1°4W8 ) 

VVx,„ copy x y/ 

DEPARTURE OP THE SOVIET AMBASSADOR PROM BUDAPEST. 

A number of rumours have appeared in the British press' 
following the return of the Soviet Ambassador, M. Pushkin, 
to Moscow to take up a new position in the Soviet Foreign 
Office. 

According to reports from Vienna, M. Puskkin was involved 
in a plot against the Hungarian State. It was alleged that 
M. Revai, Minister, of Public Education, went to the Soviet 
Embassy in order to arrest M, Pushkin, and was shot in the 
stomach in the process. 

In view of these statements it is interesting to note a 
report which has appeared in a Budapest daily paper, the 
Szabad Nep , on June 24th. Above it was a photograph of 
M. Pushkin, M. Revai and M. Farkas , Minister of Defence. 
They were all smiling broadly. The report read as follows: 

"G.A.Pushkin, ex-Soviet Ambassador in Budapest, who has 
been recalled to take up a new position in the Soviet Foreign 
Office, left the Hungarian capital on Wednesday. 

"All the members of the Government who were present in 
Budapest, the leaders of the Hungarian- Soviet Association, 
and a number of prominent figures in Hungarian political, 
economic and cultural life, came to bid him farewell. 

"The entire diplomatic corps, of which M. Pushkin was 
the doyen , was also present, as well as all the members of 
the Soviet Embassy. 

"Before the train left, M. Pushkin had a long talk on 
the platform with the members of the Government and others..." 



7 - 7 






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TMGARIAN .EBL6l.CE . CONGRESS 

BUDAPEST, JUNE 17 -.18 



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NATIONALISATION OF SCHOOLS 
IN HUNGARY . 

/Speech by Gyula Ortutay/ 



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No. 2. 



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UNION 



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Published by . 

NGARIAM NEWS O INFORMATION SERVICE 
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th July, 1950. 



HUNGARIAN PRODUCTION ...IN THE SECOND w.UARTER OF 1950. 

Every branch of factory industry over-fulfilled the increased 
production plans. 

In .the second quarter of 1950 every branch «f our economy 
showed a further considerable development. - - ; - 

INDUSTRY-- ■ 



*55 



The spread of the Stakhanovite and work competition movement made 
it possible for every branch -of factory industry to fulfil the 
increased production plan for the second quarter of the year. 
Heavy industry achieved a considerable over-fulfilment..'' 

-Factory industry over-fulfilled the production plan for the 1 
second quarter by 5.4 per cent. The plan fulfilment of heavy 
industry was 106.8 per cent, of light industry 103.9' per cent. " 
Compared with the production of factory industry in the correspond- 
ing period of. last year production increased by 34' : .3 per cent. 
Heavy industry increased by 39.6 per cent in the same period; ' 
while production of light industries increased by 29.1 per cent. 

Fulfilment of the Plan and comparison with the second 
quarter of 1949 in the different branches of industry are as 
follows: - i .{-,.; 

Branch of Industry 



Mining 
Foundry 

Machine production 
High voltage electrical 
Low voltage electrical 
Precision industry 
Hardware 

Communication repairs 
Electrical energy 
Building material 
Heavy chemicals 
Light chemicals 

Heavy industry total 

Rubber 

Timber 

Paper - 

Printing 

Textile 

Leather and Fur 

Clothing 



Plan Fulfilment 


1949 Index= 100 


• percentage 




104.2 


116.6 


107.4 


127.1 


104.4 


149.0 


111.6 


152.3 


109.9 


148.6 ' 


127.0 


230.4 


111.2 


148.4 


110.5 


183.9 


103.5 


119.9 


104.. 5 


156.5 


107.0 . 


13 7.5 


107.7 


. 148.9 


ll 106.8 


139.6 


103.5 


124.8' 


104.9 


152.5 


100.6 


123.4 


104.8 


131.3 


100.2 


122.7 


106.0 - 


137.1 


103.1- • 


187.4 ■ •. 



nnpo 1 






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Hungarian News and Information Service 

33 Pembridge Square London W2 Bayswater 2642 . A ~ D R 





27th October,. 1950. 



*5& 



MUSEUMS IN HUNGARY 



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Among the many recent cultural achievements in the People's 
Republic of Hungary, the reorganisation of the museums is perhaps 
the most interesting. Before the war, and until 19.49, the 
museums were not controlled by any one central body, being 
administered partly by the Ministry of Education, the Ministry 
of the Interior, the Committee for Public Collections, and the 
various local authorities. 

Museums in Hungary had suffered greatly from the war. 
Buildings were damaged, collections dispersed or destroyed and 
much had to be done before they could play their full part in the 
cultural life of the people. 

The tasks of reconstruction proceeded rapidly but it was 
not until 1949 that the most striking advances were made. In 
that year a Bill was passed which brought all museums under the 
control of a special d-epartment of the Ministry of Education. 
T his new department, which is responsible also for the preser- 
atio'n of buildings and monuments of historic and artistic 
importance, is known as Muzeum O.K.,. National Centre of Museums 
and Art Relics . (Muzeumok es Miiemlekok Orszagos Kozpontja). While 
the individual museums are free to prepare their own plans, 
direction and helpful' advice are given by Muzeum O.K. In April, 
1950, the first conference of provincial museum curators was held 
and they now meet together every throe months to discuss their 
problems and exchange ideas. • 

Administration' 

Muzeum O.K. has several sections, each concerned with 
different aspects of the work. There is a Registration Depart- 
ment which deals with inventories of the material in.. all; .museums . 
throughout the country. A uniform system of classification, in 
'line with the system adopted by both U.N.E.S.C.O. and the U.S.S.R., 
is used. Another important innovation is the preparation of an 
inventory of all pictures, art objects and ethnographic material 
in private collections and many hitherto unknown treasures have 
been discovered by this work. Private owners are given advice 
and help on the conservation and restoration of their, possessions. 
To ensure that the nation does not lose its treasures all .. ■ 
individuals wishing to sell objects from their collections are 
obliged to offer them first to Muzeum O.K. and permission has 
to be obtained to sell objects abroad. 

Another important section is the Technical Department which 
gives courses on conservation, restoration, methods of display 
and the preparation of natural scientific exhibits. Thirty 
research workers from the different branches of museumology are 
employed - archaeologists, scientific workers, artists, restorers 



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CHILD CARE IN HUNGARY 



*57 



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In recent years, the infant mortality rate in Hungary has been 
steadily decreasing; the average figure for 1949 was 9.8 per 
cent as compared with 13 per cent in 1938. This decrease has 
been brought about by the reforms instituted since the Liberation, 
which include special care for children and expectant mothers. 

According to the collective Trade Union agreement for 
working people, every employed woman is entitled to three 
months paid raaternity-lci»vo and benefit for a period of twelve 
weeks whilst, still feeding her child . 

Expectant mothers receive constant medical supervision 
free of charge, and should it be necessary, they are supplied 
with vitamin tablets and other protective medicines. 

The number of maternity hospitals has been increased to 
96 from 52 in 1945. Likewise new health centres have been 
established; there are now 773 as compared with 531 in 1938. 
Five thousand five hundred beds - an increase of 10 per cent 
over the pre-war figure, and over 80 per cent more than existed 
at the end of the war - are now available for maternity and 
g3maecological cases. 

Similarly, for child -patients there are some 4,280 beds 
as compared with 1,142 at the end of the war and 3,840 in 1938. 

Provision for Infants in Need of Special Care 
The Premature Children's Institute, in Budapest, under the 
charge of Dr. Suranyi , is the largest of its type in the world 
and has fifty cots. Each cot is in its own glass cubicle. 



, 



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FROM HUNGARY 



No. 8. 




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Bayswater 2642 November, 1950. 



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No. 3- 



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No. 5. 





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December, 19.50. 



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No. 10. 



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ECONOMIC NEWS 



FROM HUNGARY 



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No. 10. 



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Publishetl by 

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IMMEDIATE TASKS IN DEVELOPING HUNGARY' S NATIONAL ECONOMY 

1 Report, by Minister of State, Erno.Gero, 
j June,. 19.50. 



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HUNGARIAN PEESS COMMENT ON CLEMENCY FOR GEMANWARCRbBH 

The reduction; of tiie sentence of Ede Veesenmayer, Hitler's 
representative in Hungary during the war, was the subject of 
an article entitled "McCloy, Veesenmayer and the' Hungarian 
People", -by Gyorgy Parragi, well-known Hungarian journalist, 
and editor of the independent Budapest daily "Magyar Nemzet" 
/Hungarian Nation/. 

"The attention of the progressive world press, focussed 
on the international scandal created by the release of Krupp 
von Bohlen, Hitler's armament manufacturer and chief accomplice, 
has. overlooked another name on the American High Commissioner 
McCloy' s clemency list - a name at the sound of which every 
honest Hungarian patriot clenches his fists. Among the ninety 
names on the list we find that of Ede Veesenmayer, Hitler's 
representative in Hungary. His punishment has been reduced 
from'twenty to ten years, as a result of the politically 
inspired tenderness of the Americans. 

"If we compare Veesenmayer' s crimes with those of the 
S.S. butchers who have received clemency, we find that clemency 
has been-granted in proportion to the crime. Veesenmayer 
committed no lesser crimes than did the S.S. brigands who were 
treated like him. In fact, his crimes were even greater than 
theirs, if it is possible to classify the terrible crimes of 
mass murderers who were responsible for the death of millions. 

Thousands Deported 

"Veesenmayer' s crimes do not consist only of the deport- 
ation from Hungary of more than 750,000 people, of whom more 
than half were women, 20 per cent infants, children and 
the aged, and of the death of these people in German concen- 
tration Camps. He is not only guilty of the detention by S*S. 
guards on March 19, of political leaders who supported 
national independence . 

•In the eyes of the Hungarians his main crime is that he 
pushed Hungary into the grave, into destruction and an ocean 
of blood and tears. 



"In the eyes of foreigners, the difference between 













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19.5.1 KOSSUTH AWARDS 

An announcement made on March 15th, anniversary of Hungary's dec- 
laration of independence in 1848, revealed that 85 Kossuth Awards, -worth 
nearly a million forints /about £30,000/ had been given to Hungarian 
citizens for outstanding work during 1950. 

Awards worth 20,000 forints totalled 15, while 69 were worth 10,000 

forints each. 

Eighteen awards were granted for work in natural science, 3 for social 
science, and 29 for arts, literature, the theatre and the films." 

_ The remainder were granted for work of socialist construction to workers 
m light ana heavy industry, agriculture, public health and education. 



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SECTION I; NATURAL SCIENCE . 
Agricultural Science . .'.■■■ 

Professor Gabor Ubrizsy, 10,000 forints, for the application of Soviet 
plant protection methods and his contribution to the book "Handbook of 
Practical Plant Protection". 

Botany . 

Professor Rezso S06, 10,000 forints, for his work in botanical science. 
Chemistry . :.'. -..-': 

Professor Elemer Schulek, 20,000 forints, for research into chloro- 
cyanide compounds, the theory of absorption indicators and methods of eas 
analysis . 

Laszlo Erdei, 10,000 forints, for his work on the use of ascorbic acids 
in chemical analysis. 

Geology . 

Professor Sandor Vi talis, 10,000 forints, for contribution to geo- 
logical map-making . 

Professor Aladar Foldvari, 10,000 forints, for research into the use of 
minerals, and the discovery of mineral deposits. 

Professor Miklos V e ndel, 10,000 forints, for work on the classification 
of ore deposits. 

Medicine . 

Professor Odon Kerpel-Fronius, 10,000 forints for research on infantile 
atrophy and exciccative toxicosis. 



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*7o 



PRESS STATEMENT 

For immediate release 



September 28th, 1951 




BRITISH CHURCHMEN VISIT HUNGARY 



A party of three British, and ten French- clergymen visited 

Hungary between the 10th and 22nd of September. The British 

party consisted of Rev. Dr. Paul Levertoff ,. Director of the 

London Diocesan Work, among the, Jews, and formerly professor 

at vhe University " . 

at the Delitzsch College/of Leipzig; Rev. Dr. Bryn Thomas, 
Church Commisioner for England, Inspector of Schools for the 
diocese of Southwark and Vicar of Ascension Church, Balham; 
and Rev. Joseph Jones, Methodist Minister in charge of Kings 



Cross Mission, London. 

The visit was arranged, said Dr. Levertoff. at a press 
conference, on Tuesday for representatives of the British press, 
through an invitation from Bishop Albert Bereczky, who, on . 
behalf of the United Protestant Churches of Hungary, invited 
Dr. Levertoff to organise a party of British clergymen to visit 
Hungary. Dr. Levertoff had been in contact with Hungarian 
churchmen before the war, when he lectured in Budapest, and had 
resumed correspondence when hostilities ceased. 

The interest of the members of the party was aroused by 
the frequent allegations -in the Western press about the sit- 
uation of the Churches in Hungary. They went with a sense of 
curiosity to investigate for themselves the relationship of 
Church and State in the Hungarian People ' s. Republic. They had 
ample opportunity to investigate freely all aspects of secular 
and religious life. Dr. Levertoff speaks Russian, German and 
Czechoslovakian, besides English, and therefore was able to 
talk freely to people he met casually on his numerous in- 
dependent excursions. 

Although their main, object was to contact clergymen, they 
also visited a co-operative farm, schools (both secular and 
religious), universities, and the House of Parliament etc. 
They were impressed by the library of the House of Parliament 
which contains 260,000 volumes, amongst them 10,000 theological 



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.No. 9. 



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PROBLEMS OF SOCIALIST CULTURE IN HUNGARY 



Jozsef Revai 
Minister of Public Education 



Speech at the Second Congress of the 
Hungarian Working People's Party 



February 26th, 1951. 



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EVERYDAY LIFE 
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■No. 




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NEWS FROM THE HUNGARIAN PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC 

Published by 

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EVERYDAY LIFE 
IN HUNGARY 




No. 9 



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NEWS FROM THE HUNGARIAN PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC 

Published by 

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CULTURAL NEWS 
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No. 11 




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NEWS FROM THE HUNGARIAN PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC 

Published by 
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Special Service No. 6. 



7 th February 1952. ^77 



MEW INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT^ 




HUNGARY DURING iqqil 

These factories are in addition to the bis; Stalin Iron 

factoVof STSf bZ? P T r v Stati0n at In0t ^ ^hfnSw^Sbe 
szes no?hiS% ? Hakosi Works in Budapest and the Zalaeger- 
szeg Clothing Factory, which all started work during 1951. 

Jas_zbereny Engineering Factory 

tlon °?hf'o g ?f t 4. 20tJ:1 ' anniversary of Hungary's new Constitu- 
tion, this factory, situated in the middle of the Great 

SSfS^uSdSi f r ted -? r ° dUCinS Certain types of ^chines 
crushes i^Sl ^J 11 en Smoering. These include rock 

andtrick anfttfe freSses?' ±lotation equipment, ball Mils, 

Medium Engineering Works 

mairJ^? W m ^ ium engineering works has been inaugurated at 
fo^foff^rV^^ th " Paction of drilling equipment 
trLs^orSii U ? r;7 ^ undG ^ ke *- Its products include a 
in SungarJ J ^ billing machine never before made 

Ve szprem Dye Factory 

l^JiT^ J ec ° mber the fi ^st department of the country's 
largest dye factory, situated in Veszprem County, started 
production. Various kinds of dyes, including aniline dyes 



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December 1952. 



Documents o n i?'or e ign Affairs N o, 






NOTE TO YUGOSLAV GQVSkdJiMEM! 



The Ministry of Foreign xixiairs of the Hungarian People's 
Republic presented the following Note to the Yugoslav Legation 
in Budapest, according to a statement issued on Nov ember 25th, 
1952. 

"At the public trial of Laszlo Balint and his accomplices, 
held at Budapest County Court on November 15-17? it was proved 
without doubt, by the testimony of witnesses, documentary and 
other objective evidence, that:' 

"l) The official organs of the Yugoslav Government , viz., 
the leaders of the UDB , are regularly organising espionage and 
terrorist groups from vagrants, criminals and similar elements, 
and supplying them with weapons of .American, origin, quick-acting 
poison, forged Hungarian documents and money, and then putting 
them across the frontier onto Hungarian territory under heavy 
fire cover, with instructions to carry out espionage activity, 
murder and acts of terrorism, to blow up bridges and kidnap 
Yugoslav emigres: 

"2) The crimes committed and planned by Laszlo Balint and 
his accomplices had not only been suggested and prepared by the 



official organs of the Yugoslav Government, but 
these criminal acts had been carried out on the 



lurtnermore , 

instructions 



and with the participation and support of the official Yugoslav 
organs, and that the Yugoslav frontier guard organisation had, 
by staging armed attacks across the frontier and provocations, 
assisted the kidnappers in UDB pay in being taken across the 
Hungarian frontier as well as covering their return to Yugoslavia 
after they had carried out the criminal acts with which they were 
entrusted: 

"5) That in flagrant abuse of the diplomatic privileges 
granted it by the Hungarian People's Democracy, the Yugoslav 
Legation, acting on the instructions of ■ its Government, sup- 
ported espionage ?nd diversionist activities directed against 
the Hungarian People's Republic by assisting the members of the 
murderous espionage gang of Laszlo Balint and his accomplices 
in the execution of the espionage activity, and ensuring them 
contact with the UDB headquarters in Belgrade. 

"On the basis of the above facts the Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs of the Hungarian People's Republic has established that 
the Yugoslav Government bears full responsibility for the crimes 
revealed at the trial at the Budapest County Court on November 
15-17, 1952. In order to deny its grave responsibilities, the 



Yugoslav Government presented 
in Belgrade on November 20th, 



a Note to the Hungarian Legation 
1952, which - in view of the 



irrefutability of the facts proved beyond any shadow of doubt - 
tried on the one hand to discredit the trial with empty phrases 



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33 Pembridge Sqiiare London W2 Bayswater 2642 



HUNGARIANS, THIRD AT 1948 OLYMPICS, HAVE 
HIGH HOPES FOR HELSINKI 
By John Cardew 





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The Hungarians, placed third at the 194-8 Olympic Games 

in London with 10 gold medals , are certain to prove strong 

challengers at Heisinki\ ll,Ll ~Tor a country of onl y 9 million 
people Hungary has an outstanding Olympic re corn and 1 fne 1 enor- 
mous sums spent in recent years by the Government, trade 
unions and sports clubs on promoting and improving sports of 
all kinds throughout the country have undoubtedly produced 
results. 

Except for the 1920 games at Antwerp, Hungary has parti- 
cipated in every Olympiad. The third place gained by the 
Hungarian team in 194-8 equalled the country's record at Berlin 
in 1936 and the team going to Helsinki - a bout 25 f) - crhr 'op p ' -- 
appears to be better equipped than any of its predecessors 
to improve on this position. Groups now getting ready for 
Helsinki cover athletics, wrestling, boxing, swimming and 
water polo, fencing, football, physical training, rowing, 
canoeing, cycling, shooting and basketball. 

All have been in full-time training since the beginning 
of March in a number of special camps provided by the Govern- 
ment, the largest and most modern being at Tata i n the p ictur- 

•& & Cl f oy s^anaiiumerou s experts are in residence atrhese camps. 
Hungarian training methods have advanced considerably in 
recent years; the number of sports doctors has increased - one 
of the leading woman swimmers going to Helsinki is in fact 
training for the profession - and there has been no stinting 
of resources to give athletes every possible advantage. As 
was the case when they came to London in 1948, the Hungarians 
will take their own food and cook to Helsinki. 

Champion Hammer Thrower 

The fact that two members of the Hungarian team - the 
hammer thrower IMRB NEMETH and the wrestler -GYULA BOBIS are 
Members of Parliament is undoubtedly a reflection of the 
extraordinary sports consciousness of the people as a whole. 
Both Nemeth and Bobis have declared that they believe their 
election to the National Assembly to be, among other things, 
an indication of the esteem in which outstanding sportsmen 
are held in the country. 

Hammer thrower IMRE NEMETH is no stranger to sportsmen 
in a number of European capitals, including London where he 
has competed in British Amateur Athletic games. He won the 
hammer throw in 194-8 with a throw of 56*07 metres, a distance 
he has since bettered on several occasions. His record is 
59.88 metres, established recently in Hungary, and at Helsinki 




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Hungarian News and Information Service 

33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswntcr 6080. 




*S0 




October, 1952 
HUNGARIAN PRODUCTION RESULTS 
IN THE THIRD QUARTER OF 19S? 

Report issued by the Central Office of Statistics^ 
INDUSTRY 

■p Manufacturing industry successfully fulfilled its ^lan 

whole Xl^tn r a f er °J 1952 ' "to^«c?u3S industry as^ 
whole xulixlled its production plan by 100.1 per cent Within 

^? c ? te SO*7 *eavy industry fulfilled its plan by 98 3 per 
Sy l^l^per^ent 3 !^ * 10 °' 9 P6P C6Gt "" * he f °° d ^uKry 

duced^*?^ 1 * 5 uarter ^° f !952 manufacturing industry pro- 
duced 24.3 per cent more than in the same period of 1951, in- 

cen? ?^/l Ph? 8r S e ^ increase f0 ^ ^eavy industry, 10.9 per 
cent for light industry and 52.6 per cent for the food industry, 

x 6 c ^ h jl* he h r^ indu ^T, mining production increased by 

It? 5f? JSJ 1 r-fi 1Urgy by 21 ' 2 per cent > engineering by 7 
54.2 per cent, building materials industry by 15.5 per cent- 

end tne ?ii^ ht in , dus ^> te ^e industry increaie P d by 7.1% 
Sj4-?f ri Ji 0th J n8 ind ^ str y by 14.1 Per cent. Production of 

bv 5U ? Sf5 r if? S elon S in S to local industry has increased 
Dy 1U5.1 per cent during one year. 

In the third quarter of 1952 industries belonging to the 
various Ministries fulfilled the plan as follows: ° 

Ministries 



Mines and Power 

Foundry and Engineering 

Medium Engineering 

Light Industry 

Food Industry 

Building Materials Industry 

Industrial Enterprises belonging to 

the Ministry of Construction 
Industrial Enterprises belonging to 

the Ministry of Communications 
Local Industry 



Fulfilment in Percentage 

102.2 

99.6 

82.8 
101.1 
105.2 
105.2 

111.7 

106.5 
102.9 



-p ^.^e production plan for handicraft co-operatives was 
tuitiiied by 108.8 per cent; production was almost doubled 
as compared with the same period last year. 

• *.i T iie production of the more important industrial goods 
in the third quarter of 1952, expressed in percentages of 
the production of the third quarter of 1951, was as follows 

CORI . _ 



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No. 13, January 1953. 



Y-D8 izd 



*£ 



Peace Movement in Hu 



NEWS FROM THE HUNGARIAN PEOPLE'S R 



Published by Hungarian News and Information Service, 33 Pembridge Square^ 




*->* 



, W.2 



HUNGARIANS AT PEOPLE'S CONGRESS FORfPEACE 



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A strong delegation, including workers, peasants, 
intellectuals, Protestant and Catholic clerics, and a 
member of the Hungarian Olympic team repre- 
sented the Hungarian peace movement at the 
People's Congress for Peace held in Vienna in 
December. 

The delegation included Professor Erzsebet 
Andics, President of the Hungarian National 
Peace Council ; Valeria Benke, Member of Parlia- 
ment and Secretary of the Hungarian National 
Peace Council ; Professor Lajos Janossy, the world- 
famous cosmic-ray "scientist; " Professor Gyorgy 
Lukacs, the literary critic and historian; Tibor 
Meray, the Hungarian journalist recently returned 
from Korea ; and Ferenc Puskas, a member of the 
victorious Hungarian Olympic football team. 




Professor Gyorgy Lukacs, literary critic and historian, member 
of the World Council of Peace. 

The Churches were represented by Janos Mate, 
Catholic Vicar-General of Veszprem, Father Endre 
Babocsa ; Bishop Bereczky and Bishop Peter of the 
Calvinist Church, and Bishop Veto of the Lutheran 
Church. Other members of the delegation were 
Stakhanovite workers, peasant smallholders, mem- 
bers of co-operative farms and school teachers. 

Why Professor Janossy Returned Home 

Speaking to the People's Congress for Peace, 
Professor Janossy, who lived for many years in 
Britain, where he occupied high scientific posts, 
said: 

" I left my parents and my country as a very 
young man, and worked in England and later in 
Ireland. In 1950, I was invited by the Budapest 
Scientific University and the Hungarian Academy 
of Sciences to return home. I was very glad to 
do so, and two years ago, with my family, I 



" Before my return the construction of an 
institute was planned, where I was to continue 
my work on cosmic-ray research. The institute, 
which is now completed, is situated in beautiful 
surroundings near Budapest. It is part of a larger 
organisation, the Central Physics Research Institute, 
which the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is 
organising in the framework of the Five- Year Plan. 

Scientific Workers Honoured 

" I have told you all this," said Professor Janossy, 
" because I want you to know that in the peoples' 
democracies scientific workers are greatly honoured 
and receive the necessary financial support. This 
entails serious responsibilities, but we undertake 
these with pleasure. It is only natural that we are 
expected to do good work, and to train young 
scientists to become serious scientific research 
workers. 

" As well as the obligation of doing scientific 
work, we are expected not only to be engrossed 
in work. The scientists see that their activities 
are closely linked with the interests of the country 
and of peace. Soon after my return, I began to 
take an active part in the country's political life. 
I can really say that my political activities do not 
harm my scientific work. The scientist is en- 
couraged by the knowledge that he has real 
responsibility, that he can see that his scientific 
work is an organic part of the whole. 

"The scientist is really free when he can see 
the problems and can contrive to solve them not 
only from a narrow technical point of view but 
from the broad perspective of the problems of 
peace and of a country which is building socialism. 

Scientists No Longer Isolated 

" When I look back on my work in England and 
Ireland," continued Professor Janossy, " I can say 
that I received financial support there, too — even 
if it was far less than at home. The outstanding 
difference is that I was isolated in my narrow, 
specialised field. This was not satisfactory, even 
from a personal point of view. This condition, 
characteristic of scientists in capitalist countries, 
creates the eccentric scientist. All this became 
clear when I got home. 

" It is important," concluded Professor Janossy, 
" that scientists of all countries should be in contact 
with each other, thus giving them an opportunity 
to work for peace. We are inviting many scientists 
from many countries to come to Hungary, to get 
acquainted with our problems." 

Catholics for Peace 

Janos Mate, Vicar-General of Veszprem, pre- 
sented to the Congress a bound volume containing 



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No. 10, February 1953. 



Everyday Life in Hungar k 



„ 



NEWS FROM THE HUNGARIAN PEOPLE'S REP 



UBLIC ; 



Published by Hungarian News and Information Service, 33 Pembridge Square, 'London, W.2 



NEW BUDAPEST UNDERGROUND WILL HELP WORKERS 



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The new underground at present being constructed 
in Budapest will make travel for city office and fac- 
tory workers far more rapid and comfortable. As a 
result of a bigger population and the greater number 
of employed people, the passenger transport system 
in the Hungarian capital is at present strained to its 
capacity, despite the fact that new motor bus and 
trolley bus lines have been inaugurated since the 
Liberation. 




One of the Soviet-built trolley buses in service in Budapest 

Budapest already has one underground railway, the 
oldest and smallest in Europe. Constructed in 1896, 
it runs for two miles under the main boulevard, but 
is inadequate for present conditions. 

Preliminary work for the new underground began 
in 1949, when transport statistics were compiled to 
obtain a comprehensive view of the passenger traffic 
in the Hungarian capital. "Census tickets" were given 
to passengers and the data thus collected was evalu- 
ated by statisticians and engineers. 

East- West Line Fiist 

In addition to passenger needs, the Budapest town- 
planning project and the plan for industrial develop- 
ment were also taken into account. Three lines were 
planned — an east-west line connecting Pest with the 
old city of Buda, a north-south line, and a link line 
joining all four termini. 

Tt was rleciHeH to build the five-mile 1nn<» east- 



of the city. There will be eight stations on the line, 
and part of it will be in operation by the end of 
1954. When completed it will carry 300,000 passengers 
a day. 

The underground is of the deep-level type, and 
five hundred yards of the east-west line will pass 
under the Danube, presenting special construction 
problems. The line will run at an average depth of 
210 feet below ground level. 

Luxurious Stations 

Budapest citizens will have no drab and crowded 
stations on their underground. Constructed in the 
style of the Moscow Underground, the stations will 
be large, brightly lit, and decorated with marble and 
works of art. 

Ticket halls will be at ground level, and escalators 
will carry passengers to a large hall situated between 
the two platforms. The terminal station at the 
People's Stadium is already nearing completion, and 
murals, sculptures and mosaics will be installed. 

The decorations at the People's Stadium will have 
sport as a theme. The ticket hall will contain sculp- 
tures depicting boxing, football, swimming and other 
sports. There will also be a large bas-relief in green 
marble. The large hall between the platforms will be 
lined with marble and will have eighteen mosaics. 




Working on the tunnels of the Budapest Underground 
railway 

Modern Trains 

The trains will consist of two, four or six coaches, 
according to traffic needs, and will take fifty-four 
seated and 186 standing passengers. At rush-hours 
there will he a train everv one and a half minutes. 



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33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswat 





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._ruary 1953 • 
Documents on Foreign Affai rs No. 9 

NOTE OP THE GOVERNMENT OF THE HUNGARIAN 
PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC TO THE GOVERN MENT~OF~ 
m^ UITITErTHTlTES 

A communique issued by the Information Department of the 
Hungarian Ministry for Foreign Affairs reads as follows: 

On behalf of his Government, Mr. C.M.Ravndal, Minister of 
the United States in Budapest, on 30th January 1953, presented 
a Note to the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Hungarian 
People's Republic concerning the case of the American aeroplane 
compelled to land on Hungarian territory on 19th November 1951, 
and confiscated under a final verdict as corpus delicti . In 
the Note the Government of the United States made a claim, 
devoid of any legality, that, inspite of the final verdict of 
confiscation pronounced by the Hungarian Court, the aeroplane 
and all its equipment constituted the property of the United . 
States. 

In the Note, the United States Government puts forward the ; 
claim that the Hungarian Government should return the aeroplane 
and all of its equipment, or reimburse the value of the aero- 
plane which is fixed by the American Note at #98, 779, 29. 

On 9th February, Erik Molnar, Minister for Foreign Affairs, 
gave the following reply to the Note of the Minister of the 
United States in Budapest: 

The Hungarian Government points out that the claims of the 
United States Government put forward in its Note are devoid of 
legality and, as a consequence thereof, most categorically re- 
jects them. The aeroplane in question was used by the four 
American airmen convicted of the crime of border violation of 
Hungarian State territory,, as an instrument for committing that 
crime. The Court in its verdict, in pursuance of the provisions 
of Hungarian Criminal Law at present in force, ruled that the 
objects serving as instruments of the crime, that is, of the 
aeroplane, its cargo and equipment, should be confiscated. 

The lawfulness and legality of this verdict was accepted 
by the American airmen themselves, which is shown by the fact 
that they did not appeal, inspite of the fact that the Court 
expressly reminded themr of the possibility of legal redress, 
so the verdict became. final . From the foregoing it is obvious 
that the Government of the United States is not, and cannot by 
any means be entitled to claim as its own property corpora 
delicti which had served as instruments to commit a crime, and 
were confiscated under the provisions of Hungarian Law in force 
by a final verdict of the Hungarian Court. 

As, however, in the Note presented by you the Government 
of the United States has expressed its desire to have returned 
the ae roo lane, its c.areo and eauinment « which are in the posses- 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 



33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswater 6080. 




HUNGARIAN-SOVIET FRIENDSHIP CELEBRATED 



The fifth anniversary of the Hungarian-Soviet Treaty of 
Friendship, Co-operation and Mutual Assistance was widely 
celebrated in Hungary during February. The anniversary also 
coincided with the annual Hungarian-Soviet Friendship month, 
and the second congress of the Hungarian- Soviet Friendship 
Society, which now has 1,4-00,000 members. 

On the occasion of the treaty anniversary, the late Soviet 
Prime Minister sent a personal' telegram to Mr. Matyas Rakosi, 
Chairman of the Hungarian Council of Ministers, which read as 
follows: 

"On the fifth anniversary of the signing of the Soviet- 
Hungarian Treaty of Friendship, Co-operation and Mutual Assis- 
tance, I send my best wishes, Comrade Chairman, to you personally, 
to the Government, of the Hungarian People's Republic and to the 
Hungarian people. J. STALIN." 

Mr. Rakosi sent the following message to the Soviet Prime 
Minister: 

"On the fifth anniversary of the Hungarian-Soviet Treaty 
of Friendship, Co-operation and Mutual Assistance, on behalf of 
the Government of the Hungarian People ■ s Republic and of the 
entire Hungarian people I send my warm greetings to you, dear 
Comrade Stalin, and through you to the Government of the U.S.S.R. 
and to the fraternal Soviet People. 

"On, this anniversary, permit me to express our undying 
gratitude to you, the great friend of the Hungarian people, and 
the liberating Soviet Union for the invaluable aid which has 
enabled our country to take the path of building socialism, and 
to develop from a backward agrarian country into an industrial 
country. 

"The Hungarian-Soviet Treaty of Friendship which is the 
most secure guarantee of Hungary's freedom and independence, 
serves as the solid foundation for the further achievements 
and happy future of the Hungarian. people. 

"Ih the ranks of the fraternal countries of people's 
democracy, the Hungarian people follow with, unswerving faith 
their ideal, the standard-bearer of human progress, Vie glorious 
Soviet Union, in order to prove worthy of the honourable title 
of shock-brigade in the struggle for peace and socialism. 

"From my heart I wish you and the great Soviet people 
further brilliant successes in the building of Co mm unism and 
in the unrelenting struggle for the great cause of the peace 
of the entire world. 



"Long live and flourish- the , eternal, friendship of the 






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33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswater 6080. 



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3th May 1953- 
Special _ S e _r v ice IT o . 144 

COSMIC RAYS; "GREAT RESULTS" IN HUNGARY 

Professor Lagos Janossy, the world-famous scientist who 
gave up a professorship at Dublin University to return to 
liberated Hungary in 1950, told on General Election day why 
he gave his vote to the People's Front. 

"I voted with great enthusiasm for the I'ront," he said, 
"because I see how the huge creations of our Five Year Plan 
are being realised one after the other. 

"I have only to mention one which concerns me most - the 
building of the Physical Research Institute. The department 
dealing with cosmic ray research is already functioning and 
great results are being achieved. 

"The whole Institute will be ready by the end of the 
Five Year Plan (1954) and will make it possible for us to 
overtake the Western countries in the field of research." 

* + # * * # S|i 

This material may be used in 
full or in part end it».would 
be appreciated if cuttings or 
copies in which it is used 
are sent to the above address. 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 

33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswater 6080. 

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t-VB 9zo 



28th May 1953- 



S]D_eci8.1 _ Servi ce N o . 14-6 

MONEY PRIZES FOR TRx.NSPQRT DRIVERS 

Money awards totalling £2,250 were presented to 140 
Hungarian drivers and technical leaders in the raining in- 
dustry by Minister of T r ansport laj os Bebrits. 

The prizes were for good work in the field of develop- 
ment, accident-free driving and good time -keeping. 

They were received on behalf of the men by Sand or Nagy, 
an enthusiastic supporter of the 100,000 kilometre movement 
(65,000 miles without major repairs). He had to his credit 
80,000 miles without major repairs and a record of three 
and a half years driving without being late. 

$ $ $ ♦ * * # 

This material may be used in 
full or in part and it would 
be appreciated if cuttings or 
copies in which it is used 
are sent to the above address. 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 



33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswater 



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Special Service No. 147 



29th May 1953. 



WILD BOAR IS STi,R IN EB¥ NATIIRE NILM 

Dr. 1st van Homoki-Ifagy, producer of "Kingdom on the 
Waters", announces that he has just finished shooting his 
new full length coloured nature film "From Springtime to 
Autumn" . 

He has gust returned to Budapest after seven months 
work with an expedition of eight in the Gemonce Forest on 
the banks of the Danube. 

"We watched the lives of our wild animal 'actors' from 
photographing towers and concealed places in the forest," he 
said. "The difference of this film from 'Kingdom on the 
Waters' is that larger animals are introduced. 

"We show the life of the wild boar family in the depths 



of the forist, the live; 



or 



;he deer, and we even brought in 



the recluse of the forest - the badger. 

"My favourite 'actors' the birds are again in the film, 
but this time we have turned our cameras on the high-flying 
eagle and the nests of the red-beaked black stork. Almost 
100 different creatures were filmed." 

It is expected that the film will be ready for exhibi- 
tion in the autumn. 

* * * * $ * * 

This material may be used in 
full or in part and it would 
be appreciated if cuttings or 
copies in which it is used 
are sent to the above address. 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 



33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bay 





19th June 1953. 



Special Servic e_Ho._ 161 

AND NOW - SUPERSONIC WINES 

Wine research workers in Hungary are experimenting with 
a method of supersonic treatment of wines to speed up the 
maturing process. 

At present Hungarian high quality wines take three to 
ten years to mature. 

The Viticultural Research Institute has now discovered 
that by passing waves of lower or higher frequency than sound 
into wine the chemical processes are speeded up. Experiments 
so far show that this treatment can cut maturing time almost 
by half. 

The Institute is now experimenting on larger quantities 
at a time . v 

i'/i ;K >!* # >k % ■'? 

This material may be used in 
full or in part and it would 
be appreciated if cuttings or 



copies in which it is used 
are sent to the above address, 



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Hungarian News and Information Service 



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33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswa 




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D EAF-MUTE EDUCATION BEGINS AT THREE YEARS 

Hungarian special education for handicapped children, which 
has just celebrated the 150th year of its existence, now begins 
at the age of three. 

The first Institute of this kind in Hungary was established 
for deaf-mutes in the town .of Vac in 1802. Antal Simon, first 
director of the Vac Institute, published the first book of Hun- 
garian phonetics, entitled "The True .Master" in 1806. With this 
he laid the foundations of a Hungarian phonetical writing and 
reading method. This had a revolutionary effect on the teaching 
of reading and writing and its influence spread to general 
school education. 

In 1904 all institutions dealing with sensory and mental 
deficiencies were named "Special Education Institutes" and some 
sort of state support was ensured them. Thus a certain unifi- 
cation was established as regards finances, but was slow to 
develop on the educational side. The educationalists working 
in the institutes for deaf and dumb and blind regarded their 
pupils as having sensory deficiencies, while the mental defec- 
tives were looked upon as "psychopathies." A rapprochement of 
the two points-of-view in the educational field seemed impos- 
sible and the struggle between the two camps went on from 1904 
to 1945. 

University professors Dr. Pal Ranschburg and Dr. Artur 
Sarbo took a firm stand for unification of special education 
for handicapped children. 

Dr. Gusztav Barczi, Director of the Budapest College of 
Special Education, who this year received a high State decora- 
tion, the Kossuth Prize, and an award of £600, from the Hun- 
garian Government, published his paper on cortical deaf muteness 
back in 1935 and at the same time reported on the practical 
correction of this new clinical observation described : by him. 



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33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswater, 





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4th Janurary 1954. 
Special Service 553 

HUNGARY TO SPEN D £562 ,000 ,000 ON FARMS 

Thr ee-Year Development Plan 



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In the next three years £362,000,000 is to he spent on the 
development of agriculture in Hungary states a new Government 
order detailing measures to be taken to produce food in abundance. 

The order was issued in the name of the Government and of 
the Central Committee of 'the Working People's Party for immediate 
action. 

"We must achieve a guaranteed abundant supply in the next 
few years. of bread and flour, meat and. fat, sugar and milk, 
potatoes, greens and. wines, " %he order states. 

One section deals with increasing the productivity of the 
soil. The Ministers of heavy industry, home and foreign trade 
are made responsible for seeing tbj&t farms get 348,000 tons of 
fertiliser in 1954, 490,000 tons ML 1955 and 6;©0,000 tons in 
1956. Porty-five per cent must be nitrogenous.' 

The Ministry of Light Industry is directed to produce 30,000 
tons of superphosphate and mixed fertiliser in 1954, rising to 
100,000 tons in 1955. Granulated superphosphate must be put on 
the free market at 15s a hundredweljfht. 

Agronomists are instructed to test soil without charge to 
both co-operative and individual farmers. 

Details ploughing programmes are laid down, as well as 
figures for increased acreages under irrigation in drought- 
ridden parts of the country. 

In addition present work on the improvement of acid and 
alkaline soils must be speeded up so as to bring 250,000 more 
acres of such land into productivity in three years. Utilisation 
of almost the same area of marshland must also be started, the 
order says. 



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33 Pembridge Square, London, W2 Bayswater 6080. 



Spe c ial^ Service Ho . ^ 60 





nuary.. 1954. 



TRADE D EAL WILL BRIDGE.. SLUMP. SATS iiiGyffi 

: ; Egypt is looking to a trade deal "with Hungary to help . 
bridge the- threatened world slump, general Hassan 3?. Ragab, 
leader of an Egyptian economic delegation to Hungary,, said 
in' Budapest.*, ■• 

"We aro convinced that if we make agreements on a long- 
term basis with Hungary and the other People's Democracies 
these offer a possibility to Egypt of bridging recurring 
economic crises," he said. 

The delegation would propose to its Government an 
extension of trade between Egypt and Hungary, "Our discussions 
have convinced us that Hungary is able to supply Egypt with 
various goods to the satisfaction of both parties," the General 
added. 

General. Ragab said that, in Cairo this month President Neguib 
would open 'a Hungarian commercial exhibition - the first of its 
kind since the second world war. So far the greatest purchaser 
of Hungarian' goods had been the Egyptian Government; who had 
been very satisfied, but the exhibition would extend knowledge- 
of Hungarian goods to wide business circles. 

The delegation, which has been in Prague and Warsaw , is 
going on from Budapest to Berlin, Moscow, Bucharest and Sofia. 

■ ■ After seeing Hungarian industrial plant, and on the- basis 
of what it had seen in the U.S.A. ,- France and Germany, the 
General said the delegation was convinced that Hungary could ■ 
compete with the best in the world. 

t! We should be glad to have a committee consisting of 
Hungarian technical experts visit Egypt and study our 
Government's economic plans, 11 General Ragab said. "tfe are